California Cultures and the Social and Psychological Implications of Socioeconomic Position (15 CE)

$195.00
In stock
SKU
1568CE

CE Hours: 15

Target Audience: Psychologists, MFT, Social Workers, Counselors

Course Level: Intermediate

This course meets the BBS requirement for 15 hours of instruction on California cultures and the implications of socioeconomic position for out-of-state candidates applying for their license in California.

 

Module 1 - Cultural Competence and Humility in Assessment and Treatment
Content By: Stacey O’Brien, DSW, MSSA, LISW-s 
Instructor: Stacey O’Brien, DSW, MSSA, LISW-s

Format: Asynchronous Online Video (noninteractive). Completion requirements include watching the instructional video, completing a multiple-choice post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed), and completing an online course evaluation.   

Description: Professionals who complete this course will receive nuanced and up-to-date information about adapting therapeutic interventions to account for social determinants of health (SDH) that explain variability in mental health and treatment outcomes across diverse groups. The content in this course is applicable to Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Applied Behavior Analysts. These professionals practice with diverse client populations that could benefit from tailored interventions that reflect their unique SDH needs. 

Learning Objectives: 

Explain the importance of integrating social determinants of health (SDH) and diverse models into therapeutic interventions.
Define cultural competence and humility in the context of psychological assessment and treatment.
Discuss Intersectionality Theory and its relevance in understanding multiple minority statuses within diverse populations.
Apply assessment theories that account for social determinants of health in client case conceptualization.
Compare and contrast practical approaches to adapting interventions for specific groups such as marginalized minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals.
 

Module 2 - Exploring the Intersections of Poverty, Mental Illness, and Theoretical Approaches in Mental Health
Content By: Stacey O’Brien, DSW, MSSA, LISW-s
Instructor: Stacey O’Brien, DSW, MSSA, LISW-s
Format: Asynchronous Online Video (noninteractive). Completion requirements include watching the instructional video, completing a multiple-choice post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed), and completing an online course evaluation. 

Description: Professionals who complete this course will receive nuanced and up-to-date information about the interaction between poverty and mental health that often result in barriers to effective care. The content in this course is applicable to Psychologists, Social Workers, Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Applied Behavior Analysts. These professionals practice with diverse client populations that could benefit from tailored interventions that reflect their unique needs and poverty-related stressors. 

Learning Objectives: 

Analyze information on characteristics of poverty at global, national, and state levels.
Articulate the influence of diversity on social mobility and access to mental health care and treatment.
Recognize stigmas surrounding poverty and mental health in behavioral health practices
Evaluate therapeutic models that draw from multiple frameworks, modifying approaches to the unique needs and contexts of individual clients.
Plan therapeutic interventions to address poverty-related stressors.


Module 3 - Socioeconomic Status and Psychological Development
Content By: Tim Grigsby, PhD, and Ken Springer, PhD
Format: Asynchronous Online Reading (noninteractive). Completion requirements include reading the provided materials, completing a multiple-choice post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed), and completing an online course evaluation.   

Description: Prenatal environment and housing affects children's social knowledge and competence, emotional development, linguistic and cognitive development, physical development, communication skills, and general knowledge. In prenatal research, studies have revealed epigenetic modifications that might explain this relationship. Animal, human, and experimental evidence suggests epigenetic changes are linked to changes in brain gene expression, stress reactivity and behavior. The characteristics of housing that influence healthy development include the presence of biological, physical and/or chemical hazards, the physical design of the housing, and its psychological, social, financial, and locational attributes. Studies have linked these characteristics of housing to specific child health outcomes, but a framework linking housing to healthy child development in a broader sense is critical to the promotion of public health policy as well as interventions that support children's health.

Learning Objectives: 

Describe the epigenetic process linking prenatal environments to neurodevelopmental disorders
Identify two limitations that limit the ability of researchers to draw cause-effect conclusions about the relationship between prenatal environments and neurodevelopmental disorders
Identify how attributes of housing are linked to healthy child development
Describe how 6 attributes of housing have been found to affect 5 domains of healthy child development
 

Module 4 - Working with Immigrants and Hispanic Latino Adults
Content By
: Tamara Avery, PsyD
Course Format: Asynchronous Online Reading (noninteractive). Completion requirements include reading the provided materials, completing a multiple-choice post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed), and completing an online course evaluation. 

Course Description: Many countries have experienced a shift in cultural diversity due to high immigration rates. Pre-migratory traumatic experiences, acculturation demands, adaptation to the resettlement country’s multicultural context, and socioeconomic deprivation are immigration concomitants that may lead to mental health problem development among immigrant background youth. A key acculturation task is cultural competence development to thrive and socially participate in cultural domains and within the heritage. Researchers endeavored to examine a construct that effectively captured the same competence-phenomenon across different languages, ages, and immigrant groups. Overall, each cultural competence dimension on the Youth Culture Competence Scale (YCCS) had a unique association with depressive symptom presentation across samples. In addition to working with immigrants, this course provides an overview on how to incorporate appropriate cultural elements into treatment strategies of Hispanic/Latino client, whos represent one of the largest minority groups in California, and the United States.

Learning Objectives: 

Consider the phenomenon of culture competence and youth interpersonal behavior patterns
Define the concepts of acculturation and assimilation
Describe the Hispanic/Latino cultural beliefs around illnesses
Explain the most culturally competent treatment approaches to use with Hispanic/Latino adults and older adults
List Hispanic/Latino culturally protective factors
 

Module 5 - Homeless Populations and Justice-Involved Individuals
Content By
: Tracey Thomas, PsyD
Course Format: Asynchronous Online Reading (noninteractive). Completion requirements include reading the provided materials, completing a multiple-choice post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed), and completing an online course evaluation. 

Course Description: Providing effective treatment for homeless people and justice-involved individuals brings unique challenges for practitioners. Homeless people with severe mental illness (SMI) are susceptible to trauma exposures and other mental health consequences, whereas justice-involved individuals often do not receive effective treatment, which can lead to negative long-term consequences. In the first study in this module, the researchers sought to provide culturally sensitive interventions for identifying and treating trauma among India's SMI homeless population. To do so, they conducted exercises and in-depth interviews with 26 survivors and found a discrepancy in how trauma was classified and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. In the second article, the researchers elucidate the unique difficulties facing offenders who are diagnosed with co-occurring disorders (mental health disorders and substance use disorders). Specifically, dually diagnosed offenders receive longer prison sentences in comparison to offenders without these diagnoses. Additionally, they report a decline in terms of mental and physical health and well-being.

Learning Objectives: 

Explain the methods related to conceptualizations of trauma with the severe mentally ill homeless population.
Understand the impact of incarceration on dually diagnosed patients
Recognize evidence-based practice modalities that are applicable for treating dually diagnosed patients
 Understand the way that community-based behavioral health providers approach and address criminogenic risk and need factors
 

Course Reviewed by: Jen Kolb, LCSW
Bio: Jennifer Kolb, LCSW; Social Work Consultant, reviewed and determined the course meets requirements for continuing education in the field of social work. This course is appropriate for masters and clinical level social workers. Jennifer graduated with a Master’s degree in Social Work with a specialization in Marriage and Family Therapy from the University of Louisville, Kentucky. She specializes in school-based psychotherapy with children and adolescents, as well as licensing exam coaching and preparation.

Course Completion Requirements: Participants must complete each post-test with a score of 75% or higher (multiple attempts are allowed) and complete the course evaluation to receive a certificate of credit. 

Evaluation: The course evaluation is accessible in your student account. After successfully completing the required asynchronous activities, the course evaluation will become available in your AATBS account. 

How certificate is issued: Upon completion of the required activities, each participant will be able to access a personal CE certificate of attendance in their student account.

System Requirements:
Internet: broadband wired or wireless (3G or 4G/LTE)
Moodle-Supported Browsers:
Windows: Edge 12+, Firefox 27+, Chrome 30+
macOS: Safari 7+, Firefox 27+, Chrome 30+
Linux: Firefox 27+. Chrome 30+

Approvals

Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences maintains responsibility for this program and its contents.

Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5750. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

The Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences, provider #1085, is approved as an ACE provider to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. ACE provider approval period: 6/19/24-6/19/27.

Social workers completing this course receive 15 clinical continuing education credits.

Grievance/Refund Policy/Cancellation Policy

AATBS is fully committed to conducting all activities in strict conformance with the major mental health approving boards. AATBS will comply with all legal and ethical responsibilities to be non-discriminatory in promotional activities, program content and in the treatment of program participants. The monitoring and assessment of compliance with these standards will be the responsibility of the Program Director in consultation with the members of the continuing education committee.

Customer satisfaction is important to us. If you are unsatisfied for any reason, please send your complaint or questions in writing to info@aatbs.com. You can view our refund policy here.

For additional information, including our Cancellation Policy, please review our Terms & Conditions.

Accommodations for Disabilities: To request accommodation, please contact our office at 1-424-415-7730 or email info@aatbs.com.

More Information
Board ApprovalsAmerican Psychological Association (APA), Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB), NBCC
CE FormatOnline Video